BLACK MARKET INTERNATIONAL - CHRONICLE (selected events)

2015

Bone 18, Bern / CH 2015

Artists: Jürgen Fritz, Myriam Laplante, Wen Lee, Alastair MacLennan, Helge Meyer, Boris Nieslony, Jacques van Poppel, Marco Teubner, Elvira Santamaria Torres, Roi Vaara
Photographer Sanja Lationovic

2015

Festival Kulstof 15, Aalborg, Denmark 2015

Artists: Jürgen Fritz, Myriam Laplante, Wen Lee, Alastair MacLennan, Helge Meyer, Boris Nieslony, Jacques van Poppel, Julie-Andrée T., Marco Teubner, Elvira Santamaria Torres, Roi Vaara
Photographer Peter Lind

2011

MACRO - Museo d'Arte Contemporaneatheater, Rom / Italy,

Artists: Jürgen Fritz, Myriam Laplante, Wen Lee, Alastair MacLennan, Boris Nieslony, Jacques van Poppel, Julie-Andrée T., Marco Teubner, Elvira Santamaria Torres, Roi Vaara
Photographer Dunia Mauro

2010

Future of Imagination, Singapore

Artists: Jürgen Fritz, Amanda Heng, Norbert Klassen, Kai Lam, Myriam Laplante, Wen Lee, Jason Lim, Alastair MacLennan, Helge Meyer, Boris Nieslony, Jacques van Poppel, Melati Suryodarmo, Julie-Andrée T., Marco Teubner, Elvira Santamaria Torres, Roi Vaara
Photographer Nel Lim

2007

National Review of Live Art, Glasgow / UK

5 days performance, lectures, workshops included Brian Connolly, Alexander del Re, Esther Ferrer, Jürgen Fritz, Monica Klingler, Myriam Laplante, Wen Lee, Alastair MacLennan, Jamie McMurry, Helge Meyer, Boris Nieslony, Jacques van Poppel, Julie-Andrée T., Elvira Santamaria Torres, Roi Vaara

2005

13th Performance Art Conference, Podewil, Berlin

1. day Jürgen Fritz, Norbert Klassen, Myriam Laplante, Wen Lee, Alastair MacLennan, Helge Meyer, Jacques van Poppel, Julie-Andrée T., Marco Teubner, Elvira Santamaria Torres, Roi Vaara
2. day Jürgen Fritz, Norbert Klassen, Myriam Laplante, Wen Lee, Alastair MacLennan, Helge Meyer, Boris Nieslony, Brian Patterson, Jacques van Poppel, Julie-Andrée T., Marco Teubner, Elvira Santamaria Torres, Roi Vaara, and with unknown guests.

2003

ACCIONES EN RUTA, Mexico City and Yukatan

Artists: Katnira Bello, Rocio Boliver, Maris Bustamante, Jürgen Fritz, Norbert Klassen, Wen Lee, Alastair MacLennan, Monica Meyer y Victor Lerma, Lorena Mendez y Fernando Fuentes, Victor Munoz, Boris Nieslony, Luis Orozco, Zygmunt Piotrowski / Mex, Rosemberg Sandoval (Colombia), Victor Sulser, Elvira Santamaria Torres, Roi Vaara, Pilar Villela, Photographer ANTONIO JUÁREZ CAUDILLO

1992

EMPEDOKLES, Documenta 9, Kassel

Artists:
BLACK MARKET International: J. Fritz, N. Klassen, B. Nieslony, J v. Poppel, A. MacLennan, N. Rolfe, R. Vaara, Z. Warpechowski
NEUE HORIZONTE, Biel, Switzerland : M. Bruppacher, E. Grimm, S. Huber, Ph. Micol, E. Radermacher, U-P. Schneider, P. Streiff
Other guest artists: J. Haufler, E. Hobijn, R. Signer, B.K.H. Gutmann, R. Samens, F. Klossner On the photo: Roi Vaara, Janet Haufler Photographer Thomas Rosenthal

1990

Budapest / H; Saarbrücken / GER; New Castle U.T. and Glasgow / GB

Artists: N. Klassen , A. MacLennan , B. Nieslony , J. v. Poppel, N. Rolfe , T. Ruller , R. Vaara , Z. Warpechowski
On the photo: “BLACK MARKET International arrival at Bern”, Boris Nieslony, Jürgen Fritz, Schlachthaus Bern, 1997

1987

Das Brakteatenstück, documenta 8, Kassel

Artists: J. Fritz , N. Klassen , B. Nieslony, J. v. Poppel , Z. PioTrowski
On the photo: In the background left: Jürgen Fritz, background reight: Norbert Klassen, front: Zygmunt Piotrowski

1985

Black Market International - Established

Black Market International began, at least in Jürgen Fritz’s memory, with his first meeting with Boris Nieslony on the occasion of the “Expanded Theater” festival in Poznan in 1985, which was co-organised by Elisabeth Jappe. Jürgen Fritz took part in the festival as a member of a Polish performance group led by Zygmunt Piotrowski, and Boris Nieslony was invited as a performance artist. Fritz introduced Nieslony to Piotrowski and thus the basis for Black Market International was formed.
A first performance took place on the occasion of a conference on Japanese aesthetics in Jablona, Poland. A central theme of this conference was a basic concept of Japanese aesthetics "MA", which means "space in between". This approach was adopted as a fundamental principle in Black Market's way of working.

artists: J. Fritz, B. Nieslony, Z. PioTrowski, T. Ruller , T. Sikorski

BLACK MARKET INTERNATIONAL

is a collective of 10 artists from 7 countries (as of 2020) that has been performing, conducting seminars and lectures since 1985 and continuously building a worldwide network of performance art through close contacts with cultural leaders and associated artists. This network, in accordance with the geographical and artistic origins of the participants, builds the model of a temporary community oriented towards integrity and constructive artistic collaboration. As the group’s name suggests, a “black market” is created here: the goods to be exchanged are cultural values. The “exchange” and the “negotiation” of “value” and “countervalue” are the contents of the performances. The actions construct a laboratory situation in which the participants can experience the competence and functioning of a communication structure that BLACK MARKET INTERNATIONAL calls a mental network. This mental network can be seen as a blueprint for a utopia of social relations.

Black Market International

Boris Nieslony, Zbigniew Warpechowski, Nigel Rolfe, Black Market International, Poland Tour 1992, Photographer Jürgen Fritz

Black Market International

Boris Nieslony, Jürgen Fritz, Black Market International, Bern 1997, Photographer Martin Rindlisbacher

Black Market International

Lee Wen, Jürgen Fritz, Black Market International, EXPO 2000, Hannover, Photographer unknown

Black Market International

Jacques van Poppel., one man from audience, Black Market International, Centrum Sztuki - Galeria Laboratorium Warszawa, Poland, 1992, Photographer unknown

Black Market International

Jacques van Poppel, Black Market International, Sandomierz, Polen, 1992, Photographer unknown

Black Market International

Boris Nieslony, Janet Haufler, Jürgen Fritz, Black Market International, Bern 1997, Foto Martin Rindlisbacher

Black Market International

Boris Nieslony, Das Brakteaten Stück, Black Market International, documenta 8, 1987, Kassel, Foto Thomas Rosenthal

Black Market International

Helge Meyer, Julie Andrée T., Jacques van Poppel, Black Market International, Performance Konferenz, Podewil Berlin, 2005

Black Market International

Jacques van Poppel, Roi Vaara, Black Market International, Performance Konferenz, Podewil Berlin, 2005

Black Market International

Julie Andrée T., Roi Vaara, Black Market International, Performance Konferenz, Podewil Berlin, 2005

Black Market International

Norbert Klassen, Black Market International, Performance Konferenz, Podewil Berlin, 2005, Photographer unknown

Black Market International

Miriam Laplante, Roi Vaara, Black Market International, Performance Konferenz, Podewil Berlin, 2005, Photographer unknown

Black Market International

Jacques van Poppel, Black Market International, Neue Galerie Kassel, 1991, Photographer Thomas Rosenthal

Black Market International

Jürgen Fritz, Elvira Santamaria Torres, Roi Vaara, Black Market International, Bone 18, Bern 2015, Photographer Sanja Latinovic

Black Market International

Helge Meyer, Julie Andrée T., Esther Ferrer, Black Market International, National Review of Live Art, 2007, Photographer unknown

Black Market International

Helge Meyer, Wen Lee, Miriam Laplante, Jürgen Fritz, Black Market International, National Review of Live Art, NRLA, 2007

Black Market International

Black Market International, Bone 8, Schlachthof, Bern, Schweiz, 2005, Photographer Martin Rindlisbacher

Black Market International

Black Market International, Bone 8, Schlachthof, Bern, Schweiz, 2005, Photographer Martin Rindlisbacher

Black Market International

Elvira Santamaria Torres, Black Market International, Bone 8, Bern, Schweiz, 2005, Photographer Martin Rindlisbacher

Black Market International

Julie Andrée T., Black Market International, Bone 8, Bern, Schweiz, 2005, Photographer Martin Rindlisbacher

Black Market International

Jürgen Fritz, Marco Teubner, Julie Andrée T., Black Market International, Bone 8, Bern, Schweiz, 2005, Photographer Martin Rindlisbacher

Black Market International

Elvira Santamaria Torres, Helge Meyer, Black Market International, Performance Konferenz, Podewil Berlin, 2005, Photographer unknown

Black Market International

Roi Vaara, Jacques van Poppel, Alastair MacLennan, Black Market International, Bern, 1997, Foto Martin Rindlisbacher

Black Market International

Wen Lee, Black Market International, Acciones en Ruta, Mexico City, 2003, Photographer ANTONIO JUÁREZ CAUDILLO

Black Market International

Helge Meyer, Marco Teubner, Black Market International, Hildesheim 2000, Photographer unknown

Black Market International

Nigel Rolfe (links), Janet Haufler (rechts), Black Market International, Neue Horizonte, Empedokles, Alte Reithalle, documenta 9, Kassel

Black Market International

Miriam Laplante, Wen Lee, Black Market International, MACRO - Museo d'Arte Contemporaneatheater, Rom,Italy, Photographer Dunia Mauro

Black Market International

Wen Lee, Julie Andrée T., Black Market International, Bone 8, Bern, Schweiz, 2005, Photographer Martin Rindlisbacher

Black Market International

Lee Wen, Roi Vaara, Black Market International, National Review of Live Art, Glasgow, 2005, Photographer unknown

Black Market International

Jacques van Poppel, Jürgen Fritz, Urs Peter Schneider, Boris Nieslony, Schlachthaus Bern 1997, Photographer Martin Rindlisbacher

Black Market International

Alastair MacLennan, Boris Nieslony, Roi Vaara, Black Market International, Hellerau, Dresden, 1993, Photographer Jürgen Fritz

Black Market International

Jürgen Fritz, Nigel Rolfe, Black Market International und Neue Horizonte, Empedokles, alte Reithalle Kassel, Documenta 9, 1992, Photogtrapher Thomas Rosenthal

Black Market International

Janet Haufler und Roi Vaara, Black Market International und Neue Horizonte, Empedokles, alte Reithalle Kassel, Documenta 9, 1992, Photogtrapher Thomas Rosenthal

Black Market International

Urs-Peter Schneider, Black Market International und Neue Horizonte, Empedokles, alte Reithalle Kassel, Documenta 9, 1992

Black Market International

Alastair MacLennan, Miriam Laplante, Black Market International, Bone 8, Bern, Schweiz, 2005, Photographer Martin Rindlisbacher

Black Market International

Roi Vaara, Marco Teubner, Black Market International, MACRO - Museo d'Arte Contemporaneatheater, Rom, Italy, Photographer Dunia Mauro

Black Market International

Black Market International, Belfast, 2006, Photographer unknown

Black Market International

Helge Meyer, Wen Lee, Black Market International, Bone 18, Bern 2015, Photographer Sanja Latinovic

Black Market International

Roi Vaara, Jürgen Fritz, Helge Meyer, Black Market International, Kulstof 15, Aalborg 2015, Fotograf Peter Lind

Black Market International

Jürgen Fritz, Black Market International, Relikte & Sedimente, Offenes Kulturhaus Linz, Photographer unknown

Black Market International

Zbigniew Warpechowski (im Hintergrund), Jürgen Fritz, Norbert Klassen, Black Market International, Projekt Menschen, Galerie Lydia Megert, Bern, 1986, Photo Martin Rindlisbacher

Black Market International

Boris Nieslony, Black Market International, Acciones en Ruta, Mexico City, 2003, Photographer ANTONIO JUÁREZ CAUDILLO

Black Market International

Marco Teubner, Elvira Santamaria Torres, Bone 18, Black Market International, Bern 2015, Photographer Sanja Lationovic

Black Market International

BLACK MARKET INTERNATIONAL

VIDEOS

Texts and quotations

Prinzipien der Zusammenarbeit

B.M. ist der Name für eine Form der Zusammenarbeit einiger europäischer Performance- und Theaterkünstler. Sie treten nicht als Gruppe im herkömmlichen Sinne auf, erarbeiten keine Stücke, keine Themen.

B.M. ist aus Prinzip kein Eigentum; ist ein offenes System der Begegnung. Die Richtung, der Ablauf jeder Performance wird durch jeden Teilnehmer oder Gast bestimmt und beeinflußt.

B.M. ist ein Ereignis. Der Zustand, in dem eine Anzahl von Künstlern in einem bestimmten Raum, in einer bestimmten Zeit parallel ihre Performance aus- und vorführen.

B.M. ist eine künstlerische Idee, eine kulturübergreifende Wahlverwandtschaft.

B.M. entsteht dadurch, daß die beteiligten Künstler sich in einen ,,Raum” stellen, sich in Handlungen einfügen, sie beginnen und beenden, ihr entwickeltes Repertoire darstellen und ausspielen, zur Verfügung stellen. In der Performance ist die typische Präsens eines Künstlers, ,,seine Handlungsweise” Ursache und Grund der Begegnung.

B.M. ist ein Prinzip mit ethnisch-kultureller Dimension, die sich ,,in Bildern hinter den Bildern vor dem Bild” äußert. Dieser Raum ist das zu bildende ,,Dazwischen”.

B.M. verbindet Zeit als gestaltetes Ereignis mit elementarem Dasein. In der Performance werden Objekte (uns helfende Gegenstände) als gleichwertige Performer mit dem Repertoire der Handlungsbilder ins Spiel gebracht.

B.M. ist als Prinzip ein Erforschen von Aufmerksamkeit. In der Performance geschieht die Aufmerksamkeit nicht als offensichtliche Meditation, eher als Instinkt, als Treffsicherheit. Aus der Vielfalt des Geschehenden wird das gewählt, das jetzt und in diesem Moment die innere Bildung in der Zeit gewährleistet.

B.M. weiß, daß das absolute Alleinsein in der Handlung das konzentrierte Gemeinsame ermöglicht.

B.M. läßt das Paradox enstehen, daß das, was zu sehen ist, nicht das ist, was gesehen wird. Die Performance zeigt, wie gewisse Erfahrungen, Erkenntniszustände nicht festgehalten werden können. ,,Nicht-Gegenwärtiges wiederholen, da es nie Gegenwart wird”. Die Performance stellt ein Ereignis dar, das als Modell gesellschaftlicher Begegnung ,,Berührung” skizziert. Während, und nach der Performance wird diese Skizze verworfen. Das Ereignis wird sich jeweils neu entwerfen. Die Skizze ermöglicht durch wechselnde Teilnehmer und unterschiedene Orte dem Ereignis Dauer.

B.M. hat als Handlungsstruktur Objekte, die mit Erfahrungen, Ideen oder desgleichen besetzt sind. Mikroemotionen ist das Werkzeug der Handlung, der Umgang und das Spiel.

B.M. ist wie ,,Die Alchemie und alle bildende Künste eine virtuelle Kunst”, die ihren Sinn wie ihre Wirklichkeit nicht in sich selbst tragen. ,,Quanten springen aus dem Quantensee, Delphine tanzen aus dem Meer für Sekunden und verschwinden wieder in der Tiefe. So manifestieren sich künstlerische Prinzipien in der Realität und erzeugen Zeit und Dauer durch Erinnern. (A. Artaud)

B.M. ist in der Gestaltung des ,,MA”, des Zwischenraumes, dieses Nichts, eine Art geistigen Betretenseins.

B.M. ist performativ. Als menschliche Handlung zielt sie auf Wirkung durch Übertragung, ist analogisch. Die Performance gestaltet die verschiedenen Wertsetzungen der Teilnehmer und der Gäste. In der Geschichte der Rituale verankert ist sie doch davon weit entfernt als Ritual bezeichnet zu werden.

B.M. zeigt im Prinzip, daß alles möglich ist. Konsequenterweise reduziert sich für die Ausführenden das Wissen der Möglichkeiten, was zu tun ist, auf ein Minimum. Das immaterielle Zentrum der Performance, jeder Begegnung, das gemeinsame Wissen ist: Das Zwischen-den-Menschen; Das Zwischen-den-Dingen; Das Wissen über den Ton, die Temperatur, die Frequenz, die Nähe und Ferne und all die unaussprechlichen Dinge des Herzens.B.M. steht in der Tradition verschiedener europäischer ,,Networks” der letzten

15 Jahre und vermerkt mit Respekt wie folgt:

  • Todays Place
  • The Prediction
  • Reindeer Werk
  • Das Konzil
  • Werkzeuggruppe des Konzil
  • Minus delta t
  • East-West-Study-Project
  • Aufmerksamkeitsschule
  • Verein für Projektkunst eV.

B.M. treibt Anthropognosie

B.M. ist neben ,,ASA-European“ und „The Current Affairs“ ein weiteres europäisches Network.

15 principles of Black Market International

By Michael LaChance

The performances of BMI are exercises in derision and concentration, sacralisation and effacement. The performers try to take life seriously yet demonstrating that is worth very little, that it is held by a gesture, that is played in a moment. It is hard to describe that gesture, to say what it should look like, yet we recognize it as soon as we see it. We are familiar with metaphysics more that we want to admit and that is why we can recognize the fundamental moments of existence without even knowing what it’s about – in an epoch where the acceptance of performance as an artistic practice is not yet in the dictionaries. That is the work of BMI: create fundamental moments. And it is our job to find out why and how. In this article, we will tell you about the solo BMI performances through 15 basic principles.

The 1st principle of BMI

is the privilege of encounter. The art of encounter becomes a politic of comunitas. The members don’t have a common theme; they work in open cooperation, even if it’s not often that they are produced collectively. The title Black Market (1985) is not a group but ideas at work. Each performance must set up a singular space-time complex, exhuming the structure of encounter, which is genealogically the origin of what we call “space”. The body is sublimes in space. There is also an experience of human relation that has been deposited in what seems today like an empty frame: the abstract notion of time-space. A BMI performance seeks an encounter so that we may reappropriate space and draw the invisible links that make it up. Lee Wen makes visual contact with the public, and then does a ritual in which he takes small stones and bounces them on his head. Then he eats a handful of red peppers, leaving the audience in awe. We are attracted to him and the tears in his eyes make the silence more enveloping… Wen shows his capacity of being detached from himself, yet maintaining self-control. He seems to be saying: all our identities are false.

The 2nd principle

is the diversity of initial impulses. Each member can bring his own impulse. A BMI event can host guests that will bring their own impulse, but the initial autonomy must hold its course; the performer is a vehicle for experimentation. Elvira S. wants to get on a bus without paying, negotiating the fare with a small duck, asking the driver to be her accomplice. It is the idea of the singularity of gratuity (“only this time”). The impulse is accentuated by the resistance that is provoked, and by the possibilities of eventual negotiations.

The 3rd principle

is the parallelism of performances. We can imagine many actors on the same stage, each one reciting his own play. The happening-condition reminds us of the human condition, each one being absorbed by his own existence, each one unraveling the thread of his own existence. There is nothing in common between Alastair M. nailing fish on the wall and Roi V. writing a spiral of words on the ground. One thing is sure and it is that we must not link the interventions because it would reduce them to “episodes”. The performances enable us to see forms of life that would otherwise go unnoticed – they are “language games” (Wittgenstein)

The 4th principle

of BMI is that it is only an artistic idea, a creative hypothesis that could not be founded on certainties that must be verified in upcoming projects that need links that are not based on our cultural backgrounds. We must then choose links (structural, affective…) beyond our cultural limits. Another way of saying that out familiar world is made of a tight web of conventional links, and all things are connected to each other in the consolidation of the evidence of the world (I didn’t understand this part!!! I skip it!). With this 4th principle, BMI is conceived as a federative idea (European inspired): a mutual political and economic union that respects the cultural specificity of each member. Within this union, the cultural differences are marked but they do not risk to be menaced by concerted actions. The political dimension must be assumed: the performer must reflect on the type of relationship he wants to have with his public. Each action questions the responsibilities of the artist and of the public which, in a given situation, has a drawing force and manifests an adhesion to the event in all its ethical and political implications. In Helge M.’s relationship with his public, a unstated contract is passed: “All the clothing I wear are the result of an exchange (in a past festival in the Philippines) I must exchange them all with you today!” When it came to the last item, feminine underwear, and the public had to decide collectively about this symbolic process of nudity of the artist, whether or not to permit the complete success of the exchange protocol. The systematic character of the unraveling of the action and the quality of the interpersonal relationship in which the exchange is done contributes to the degree of response of the public. So Meyer’s mechanism is a link in an international transmission chain: the group from Le Lieu became solidary with the Philippines group. And more, each piece of clothing having a history, each spectator discovers how much his clothing is related to his own cultural universe. All this pushed an audacious spectator to come and give up his underwear in front of everybody in exchange for a black lace string that Helge M. had succeeded in putting on. Thanks to this last audacious act, all the process was ratified, and the public confirmed its ability to conclude the “procedural” contract and overcome idiosyncratic prudery. The spectators are not only people who are asked to be there, they participate in an action and become performers. Helge M. can go to his next festival with a bunch of Québécois clothing. Let’s hope he will find someone who will accept to take them.

The 5th BMI principle

is that the artist must adjust his presence in the way he feels the space, and in the way he creates a duration in time through his actions. This is an existential statement that deals with the quality of the presence and the specificity of the staging of the present. Ideally, the event that assembles performer and public should have no content or reason other than this “typical presence” that characterizes the artist, signaling an ontic event really taking place. Roi Vaara, elegant in his evening suit, starts his performance putting an alarm clock on the floor. Then he writes a series of words on the floor in a spiral. Once it is done, he swirls around and falls. He lights a cigarette and gets up, goes along the spiral in the other direction cancelling the words and replacing them by others. This performance magisterially illustrates the construction of space (the spiral) and time (the double movement centripede and centrifuge, systole and diastole), a space-time constructed hic and nunc. This vertiginal spiral of our time makes Roi V. loose his equilibrium. SO he has the good idea of changing the terms: fate (choice) etc…..

The 6th BMI principle

is that the whole process must not end in a synthesis (a demonstration, a moral…), the event’s indetermination must be maintained. A direct consequence of this indetermination is that hope remains in circuit because the virtuality of the presence is not completely actualized. BMI is an event without terms, produced within events that leave us waiting for something to follow, waking up the sense of community in the hope of a future world: recognizing in ourselves a thirst for the absolute (vodka hahaha), : recognizing in ourselves the hidden hope for a better world… Performance must give the most tangible manifestation of hope, must make hope gush like and energy flowing out of immateriality. Boris N., almost nude, rolls on the gravel holding a stone to his breast. Rolling stone gathers no moss? He underlines his nakedness in a poetical action that is close to the definition that Cage gave to poetry: a “celebration of the fact that we own nothing”. It is like acts of meditation and telluric incantation, when the stone becomes the nexus of a mental concentration, a meditative exercise that transforms the gravel of any parking lot into something as precious as the Ryoanji Zen garden in Kyoto. A car with the headlights on follows him… How can the spectator abandon himself before the “unraveling” of this performance? He can evaluate the distance covered, the speed of the movement and thus the time. He can forget himself in this temporality by projecting himself in the performer’s body (when one thinks that it must be more painful in the elbows than in the shoulders), by projecting himself into the enigmatic gravel that gives a theological aura to the event. The viewer moves along to follow the action, he is attracted by the stone that accumulates presence, when Nieslony shows that the effective daily being-alive of man, despite all the mediation of our “spectacularized” society, can be re-centered in a harder core.

The 7th BMI principle

is that time is not dissociable from the elementary presence of the artist with the public, when both negotiate each other’s presence. Since Fluxus, MACIUNAS was looking for “monostructural qualities…of a natural simple event”. It’s a rule of unity. This is why it is important to set a specific duration: the time of the basic event, from which we take conscience of others, element in which we get closer to each other but also in which we practice exclusion. The presence is overthrown by the passage of time because the situation is precarious and the participants are mortal. In the flux of time, objects and living people are all temporal actors, inert objects can become useful actors, and in fact they can become performers of equal value as the live ones. Cage had already discovered that all objects can “become Duchamp”. All stones, as long as they are willing to roll along with us on the gravel, would be Nieslony. With Norbert K., the flux of pedestrians walking on the sidewalk across the street from Le Lieu and that we can see through the window to his left and to his right, give the rhythm of time. The street life becomes a discreet actor in the performance. The performer throws flowers – symbol of the corruptible character of all things in time, he blows a white balloon – using breath as a component of the duration of the operation. Covered in a black veil, he passes a red thread from left to right, identifying himself with the three Parcae. There is no duration to this piece; the piece is nothing but this duration that unwinds in different ways.

The 8th principle of BMI is

the exploration of ethnic and cultural dimensions that are lost in the usual tracking we do by using the most current ethno cultural markings. These aspects do not appear on the map on which we would like to frame the diversity of our times. A better knowledge of cultural territories enables us to trace the borders and to play with overlapping of cultures, hybridization and crossbreeding. We find a widening of the intermedia project that Dick Higgins is keen on, towards “interstitial” productions, intercultural poetics. Alastair M.’s performances deals with objects whose connotation is specific to certain regions: in Northern Ireland, an individual with a nylon stocking on his head that nails mackerels to the wall, doesn’t give the same impression as in, let’s say Italy. M. proposes an installation: on the wall (three small plastic ducks, three mackerels) and all the material on the floor, need an interpretation, just like the door through which he finally disappears.

The 9th BMI principle

is that performance is an investigation of forms of attention, from the reflective or meditative attention to a purely instinctive attention. This instinct enables us to recognize instantly “what must be”, what corresponds to the right unwinding of the event, to the natural traveling of time. But we are not familiar with the logic of the event, we cannot narrate its course – it stems from an inner knowledge that is like the analogon of the structural unity of the world. Or it stems from the world that knows itself through us.

The 10th BMI principle

is that all must occur in life. Here, we find Robert Filiou’s exhortation: “Art is where you live”. Art must be founded in life and merge with life so that in return life can take hold on art: esthetics must open the road of ethics. So the art of performance knows no limits, so life surfaces in its reinvented project, offering through its decisive actions, the impression of truth. Nieslony tries to create daily koan on life’s synopsis (Daily Life Plots Koan)

The 11th BMI principle

stipulates that it is in the heart of total solitude that we can find the greatest concentration that we can reach the utmost and accomplished being-entity. We think of Lee Wen’s solitude holding on to his stool to absorb the shock of his peppers, Nieslony’s solitude in which he realizes that the stone is his ally.

The 12th BMI principle

aims at maintaining performance in an ontological paradox: the ambivalence of being and non-being, of visible and invisible – trying to give form to a third element, that of a differed existence, of a constantly imminent emergence. A lot of our experiences and perceptions are not stored because they don’t seem to contribute positively to our dichotomous and positivistic perception of the world. However we must find these experiences again, recognize them as sketches of another world, or of a multiplicity of worlds: as dreams dreaming themselves. Performance enables us to seize these experiences and perceptions, and to organize them according to what Daniel Charles calls “insular or compartmental structurations, rather than informative o sequential”.

The 13th BMI principle

is performativity. Performance, as seen by BMI, is not the search for a greater technical or utilitarian efficacy; it is neither the development of a narrative knowledge that may challenge the great tales of modernity, as in Lyotard’s proposed alternative. It is the performativity of a direct transmission, where saying is doing and doing is saying. In direct performativity – as in “direct provocation” – the discourse and the action merge: a thought or a word surfaces from the action, and it is a thought or a word that must become action. When accomplished, the word no longer has to be said, it becomes a virtuality of silence. Another aspect of performativity: when the literal and the figurative combine, the performative encounter will be positive and through manipulation, symbols will be either desecrated or sacralized. It is like this when Jacques V.P. makes believe he is regimenting his public, buries his flag, distributes fetishist objects, all with the help of a translator called Nathalie, in an action interspersed with the reading of chapters of Tao te King. And in the finale, a well-known Gilbert Bécaud song about a pretty guide in Moscow is played. As if we could hear this song only through the present situation we are living.

The 14th BMI principle

is that we must stay away from common language; we must practice a game of non-communicative provocations that create in the end a deficit of interpretation, a hearing hindrance, and a spiritual embarrassment. Pro-vocation: provocare, “call (vocare) out”, place the voice outside, towards the outside. It is rather an ante-vocation, a call from inside. Auto-exhortation. The BMI performance, which has only a few vocal effects from the verbal sphere, suggest the passage from a verbal communication to a communication from self to self, self-oriented through vital energy. This concerns first of all the performer, who is carrying out a scenic activity disjointed from the reactions and participation of the public. Moments of energy that concern only him: Boris N. did not only carry a heavy stone, he made a crowd disappear, allowing it to become something else. On the gravel, under the highway, Nieslony is holding onto a piece of absoluteness. In fact, he is an admirer of Martin Buber, who said: “The words of he who wants to speak with human beings without speaking with God will not be accomplished; but the words of he who wants to speak with God without speaking with man will be lost”.

The 15th BMI principle

is that all is possible. The simple fact of reminding this during a performance means inciting shock. It is putting on us the weight of the immensity of reality. Then, the room seems small, the action seems trifling, and our knowledge seems useless. The only thing we must know is that the real form of a work of art is its approaching the other, and its true color, its attraction, its impact etc., all this has no place except in the people. When Roi V., sweating and panting, comes back from his vertigo, he tries to light a cigarette, but his lighter doesn’t work. Someone from the public comes up with another lighter, but Vaara crossly throws it out. We don’t leave a chance to possibilities because we determine from moment to moment what it should be!

JÜRGEN FRITZ

VORTRAGSPERFORMANCE

zu der Reihe Performance Art in NRW, vorgetragen am 14.03.1997

Performances in der Art, wie sie von BLACK MARKET vorgestellt werden, sind … out.

Das ist, zumindest sinngemäß, eine Feststellung in dem im vorigen Jahr erschienenen und vielbeachteten Buch mit dem Titel Performance von Marvin Carlson, einem Professor für Performance an der City University in N.Y… Demnach habe sich die Performance seit den 90ern generell in zwei Richtungen entwickelt: Einen hauptsächlichen Trend in der Performance Art sieht Carlson in der Rückkehr zu Text bzw. zu bewußt theatralen, textbezogenen lnszenierungen, wie beispielsweise bei der Woostergroup, Spalding Gray oder Laurie Anderson. Er zitiert in diesem Zusammenhang eine neue New Yorker Performancerichtung, die 1995 in verschiedenen cafes der Stadt “in” war: “rap meets poetry”.

Mit dieser Rückkehr des Textes hätte sich tatsächlich die grundsätzliche Anti-Haltung der Performance Art gegenüber dem Theater aufgelöst. Diese Abgrenzung gegenüber jeglicher Form von dramatischer Struktur und psychologisch fundierter Dynamik, wie sie zumindest dem traditionellen Theater eigen ist, wurde 1970 in einer Diskussionsrunde um Alan Kaprow als wesentliches Merkmal der Performance Art definiert. Zu diesem Kreis um Kaprow gehörten auch Vito Acconci, Yvonne Rainer und Joan Jonas 1.

Eine weitere dominierende Entwicklung sei das sogenannte “Theater der Bilder”, wie es beispielsweise von Bob Wilson, oder, durch dessen Vorbild, von Laurie Anderson 2 initiiert worden ist. Es ist offensichtlich, daß es wesentliche Unterschiede gibt, vergleicht man die Performanceshows von Wilson, Anderson, der Wooster Group, die neueren Vorstellungen von Marina Abramovic oder auch die der BAK-Truppen mit den Performances, die in diesem Jahr hier vorgestellt werden. Doch diese Unterschiede liegen meiner Ansicht nach weniger darin, daß die einen mehr text- oder bilderbezogen bezogen sind, und die anderen sich vielleicht mehr aus der Tradition der 70er Jahre herleiten lassen.

Der Unterschied liegt im Begriff der Inszenierung und deren Implikationen. Und auch hier denke ich nicht an Authentizität (ein guter Schauspieler kann ungeheur authentisch sein) oder an die Forderung nach Einmaligkeit, die oft als wichtiges Merkmal von Performance Art benannt wird.

Aktion

Ich habe vor drei Wochen einen wunderbaren Vortrag von einem Schweizer Professor namens Groß gehört, der damit anfing, daß er ja einen vorbereiteten Vortrag dabei habe, er jetzt aber keine Lust habe diesen vorzutragen, sondern lieber über etwas anderes sprechen möchte, und er fing an darüber zu erzählen, wie er am Vormittag die Umgebung des Vortragsortes abgeschritten sei, was er so alles gesehen habe – nämlich viele Geschäfte mit Computern und deren Zubehör und fast in jedem Gäßchen, das er passiert habe – ein ausrangiertes Plüschsofa – und damit war er beim Thema. In den Wohnzimmern weiche die Bequemlichkeit des roten Samts der Hart-ware des Computerzeitalters.

Das hat mir sehr imponiert. Das war offensichtlich eine Art der richtigen Rede – eine echte nicht Performance sondern Performanz – mit ‘z’ – eine gelungene Rede – deren Gelingen erst einmal vollkommen unabhängig davon ist, worüber geredet wird – sondern nur davon, wie man das tut.

Was hat Herr Groß gemacht? Er wählte im richtigen Augenblick die richtigen Worte und das richtige Verhalten – kurz, er handelte richtig. Es ist diese Form des Handelns und der freien Rede, welche ursprünglich 3 die einzigen Möglichkeiten von politischer Tätigkeit darstellten. Jede andere Tätigkeit war von der Notwendigkeit des Lebens vorgegeben, konnte nicht frei gewählt werden, und unterschied damit den Menschen nicht von anderen Lebewesen. Nur die freie Rede und die Handlung waren demzufoge nur dem Menschen eigen, und waren damit die einzigen Möglichkeiten, Mensch unter Menschen zu sein.

Selbstverständlich war der, in meinem Beispiel genannte Professor einem bestimmten Druck ausgesetzt, er war eingeladen worden und hatte eine Rede zu halten, für die er sich auch ein Konzept zurechtgelegt hatte. Aber er hatte sich davon befreit – er hattte sein Konzept weggelassen und im Moment der Rede andere Worte gewählt.

An dieser Idee von Handlung, oder der freien, richtigen Rede wird auch der Unterschied einer Performance von BLACK MARKET zu einer theatralen Inszenierung bzw. zu einer Performance-Show deutlich: Die Performer von BLACK MARKET bringen keine fertigen Stücke sondern nur Material mit, das möglicherweise benutzt wird. Es gibt nur minimale Absprachen, was den Verlauf der Performance, bzw. die Gestaltung des Performanceortes betrifft. Erst im Moment der Performance wählt der Performer sein Material und entscheidet, wie er es einsetzt.

Im zweiten Handbuch von BLACK MARKET heißt es dazu:

“BLACK MARKET zeigt im Prinzip, daß alles möglich ist. Konsequenterweise reduziert sich für die Ausführenden das Wissen der Möglichkeiten, was zu tun ist, auf ein Minimum. Aus der Vielfalt des Geschehenden wird das gewählt, das jetzt und in diesem Moment die innere Bildung in der Zeit gewährleistet.”

Aktion

Bei einigen Indianerstämmen Nordamerikas gab es ein Fest mit dem Namen Potlatsch. Es wurden viele Geschenke verteilt, aber auch Wertgegenstände zerstört. Nicht als agressive Geste, sondern um unter dem Zeichen der Verschwendung den Charakter einer richtigen Gabe zu offenbaren. Es gibt grundsätzlich zwei Möglichkeiten der Gabe: bei der Einen gibt der Mächtige dem Unterstellten und unterstreicht mit dieser Demonstration seinen sozialen Rang. Die andere ist, wie die richtige Rede, vollkommen frei von irgendeiner Zweckgebundenheit. Es ist eine Handlung als Mensch unter Menschen.

Aktion

Wer versteht oder beurteilt, ob eine Handlung eine “richtige” war oder nicht? Diejenigen, die diese Handlung ausüben, und diejenigen, die ihr beigewohnt haben, im Falle einer Vorstellung das Publikum.

Eine Performance vermag “communitas” herzustellen. Communitas ist, der Ethnologie zu Folge, eine Gemeinschaft; eine außerhalb der momentan geltenden Sozialstruktur, außerhalb der momentan geltenden gesellschaftlichen Verhaltensnormen spontan entstehende, auf unbegrenztem gegenseitigem Verstehen basierende Gemeinschaft.

Jeder kennt diese Momente, in denen man das Gefühl hat, man sei eins mit allen und allem; es ist eine Art instinktives, luzides Eintauchen in das, was Martin Buber als wesenhaftes “Wir” bezeichnet 4 . Ein Erlebnis, das einer Erleuchtung gleichkommt.

Man kann annehmen, das jeder spirituellen Gemeinschaft, jeder Utopie von Gesellschaft der Versuch zu Grunde liegt, diese persönliche Erfahrung von communitas in ein Regelsystem zu übertragen, in der diese als besonders “wahrhaftig” empfundene Form der Interaktion zur Grundlage des Zusammenlebens werden soll.

Victor Turner, einer der führenden Theoretiker der Performance im ethnologischen Sinne, schreibt dazu Folgendes:

“Menschen, die in Form spontaner Communitas miteinander agieren, werden total von einem einzelnen, durch » Fluß« (Verschmelzen von Handlung und Bewußtsein) geprägten Ereignis absorbiert.”5

Und hierin ist der utopische Entwurf aber auch die Möglichkeit des Scheiterns der Idee BLACK MARKET zu finden: Spontane communitas, die durch theoretische Konzepte in ideologische, oder durch ein Regelsystem in normative communitas übertragen wird, verwandelt sich in Zwang, und verunmöglicht geradezu das Entstehen einer neuerlichen spontanen Situation.

Um dem zu entgehen, versucht BLACK MARKET keinen Stil aber auch keine Abgrenzung gegenüber anderen Stilen festzuschreiben, sondern versucht ein offenes, ständig wechselndes System der Begegnung als Plattform der künstlerischen Arbeit anzubieten.

Zbigniew Warpechowski hat nach der ersten Performancereihe von BLACK MARKET folgendes dazu geschrieben:

“… Einige Monate nach dieser Reihe von verschiedenen Performances, dieser Reise, kann ich folgendes zu meinen Erfahrungen sagen: Der geistige Dialog, der gemeinsame Versuch, geistigen Kontakt aufzunehmen, setzt gute Vorbereitung, innere Einstellung und bewußte Isolierung, Geschlossenheit, Ausscheiden aus der Normalität des Alltags und seiner Bedingungen voraus. Ebenso Ablehnung aller Zwänge und Kontakte nach außen. Zugleich bedeutet das: der Verzicht auf Egoismus, Konkurrenz, Bevorzugung, Ränke oder Ähnliches. Die Zeit dieser Isolation kann so lange dauern bis jeder ‘keinen Weg’ mehr weiß. Jeder braucht seine Zeit, um aus seinem eigenen psychischen Rhythmus herauszutreten und in den gemeinsamen Rhythmus des ‘Nicht Sein’, der zwanglosen Zustimmung für ‘BEDEUTUNGS-LOSIGKEIT’ überzugehen. Das bedeutet Aufhebung des ‘Künstler – Sein’ und: Aktionen in der Kunst. Diese Voraussetzungen können nicht dauernd eingehalten werden und sind auch nicht dauernd erfüllt worden…

Die Bedeutung von BLACK MARKET kann als ‘Erfolg’ oder ‘gescheitert angesehen werden, nicht aber als Erlebnis ‘Black Market’ mit seinen transzendentalen Erscheinungen…”

Zbigniew Warpechowski 6.

Aktion

Jede Art der Handlung oder der richtigen Rede ist grundsätzlich monologisch, und geschieht auch in einer temporären Gemeinschaft wie BLACK MARKET als paralleler Monolog. Doch die Performance entsteht als das Mehr aus der Summe der Monologe im “Dazwischen”. Peter Brook untersucht es als das “in between”, beispielsweise als das zu gestaltende “Zwischen dem Schauspieler und dem Zuschauer”, in der japanischen Kunsttheorie ist es das “MA”, auf das der einzelne Akteur nicht direkt zugreifen kann. Er kann nur versuchen, eine Situation zu schaffen, sie zu bewegen, mit ihr zu spielen, sich in sie hinein- oder aus ihr hinaus zu bewegen, in der die Performance als Bild der Begegnung entsteht.

Im zweiten Heft von BLACK MARKET schreibt Boris Nieslony dazu:

“Das immaterielle Zentrum der Performance, jeder Begegnung, das gemeinsame Wissen ist: das Zwischen-den-Menschen; Das Zwischen-den-Dingen; Das Wissen über den Ton, die Frequenz, die Nähe und Ferne und all die unaussprechlichen Dinge des Herzens 7.

Schlußaktion

  1. Marvin Carlson: Performance. Routledge, 1996. S. 106
  2. L.. Anderson seit 1976 durch Glass’ und Wilsons Einstein on the Beach dazu inspiriert worden, ihre bis dato kleindimensionierten Stücke zu großen Multimediaswows wie United States weiterzuentwickeln. Carlson S. 114
  3. Im Sinne Aristoteles wie in der Nikomachische Ethik, Buch I,5 dargelegt. Zitiert in Hannah Arendt: Vita Activa, Serie Piper, 1994. S. 144ff und Anmerkungen S. 319
  4. Martin Buber in: Ich und Du, 1923
  5. Victor Turner: Vom Ritual zum Theater, Fischer, 1995, S. 74
  6. Zbigniew Warpechowski in: BLACK-MARKET – Performances, Hrsg.: Neue Galerie Kassel, Verlag Michael Kellner, Hamburg, 1986
  7. Boris Nieslony in: BLACK-MARKET – Performance, Heft 2, Hrsg. Black Market International

Black Market International

Myriam Laplante, Black Market International, National Review of Live Art, NRLA, 2007, Photo Silvie Ferré

Working in a BMI performance for me is like entering a different dimension, a parallel reality where anything can happen but also where I can blindly trust everybody involved, in such a way that it is possible to challenge the laws of gravity, of time, of matter, of art, of performance.

Black Market International

Alastair MacLennan, Black Market International, Bon 8, Bern, Schweiz, 2005, Photographer Martin Rindlisbacher

Black

Alastair MacLennan

 

Black Market’s most interesting work (to the artist) comes through

the marginal, the unexpected, no conventional staging, or seated audiences

‘ordinary’ living situations (with their treble, quadruple twists) extremes of success and failure work invoking real (not symbolic or metaphoric) doubt, wonder and awe

the use of actual danger (physical and mental), contradiction and ‘artlessness’ concern with political, social and cultural malfunction

victims (and how)

bottoming out of values

splintering of whole Systems

feeding from life, not frozen cultural forms

being simultaneously opposite and not – (three’s company, two a crowd)

siting work out of traditional spaces, theatres, galleries, museums, concert halls, re-activating the concept of pilgrimage

getting there being part of the work unfixing the fixity of text

working from cracks in old vessels

making work from gaps in new systems

using the potential of distortion through mediation what does and doesn’t collapse in on itself

uncertainty as subject and object matter

linking up inter regionally, globally (not internationally) making art without ‘artists’

making ‘nothing’ engaging, entertaining and provocative eschewing artifice

promoting work which shows faith in the present

while surfing through post-modernism, locating pre-modern archetypes within fusing actual and virtual time/spaces

endeavouring to realise I work from the unimageable.

Black Market International

Zbwigniew Warpechowski, Empedokles, Black Market International, documenta 9, 1992, Photo Thomas Rosenthal

A few months after this series of different performances, this journey, I can say the following about my experience:
Spiritual dialogue, the common attempt to establish spiritual contact, presupposes good preparation, inner attitude and conscious isolation, closure, leaving behind the normaIity of everyday life and its conditions. and its conditions. Likewise, rejection of all pressures and contacts with the outside world.

At the same time, this means renouncing egoism, competition, favouritism, intrigue and the like. The time of this isolation can last until everyone knows “no way”. Everyone needs time to step out of their own psychic rhythm and into the common rhythm of “not-being”, of unconstrained consent for “MEANINGLESSNESS”. This implies suspension of “being-an-artist” and: Actions in art. These conditions cannot be fulfilled permanently and have not been fulfilled permanently.
The meaning of “Black Market” can be seen as success or failure, but not as the Black Market Experience with its transcendental phenomena.

Zbigniew Warpechowski

Black Market International

Jacques van Poppel, Black Market International, Bone 8, Bern, Schweiz, 2005, Photographer Martin Rindlisbacher

Hammer

Black Market, yes Black Market.

Why do I keep thinking of Mack Blarket?

To me Black Market is an attitude. Also there is a group of artists, calling themselves “Black Market International”.

International? Good good question. Now suppose I would leave this group of artists, would that mean that I am out of Black Market?

Or, was I not in, until I became a member of this group? I think not.. -I think Black Market has nothing to do with me. Nor has it with the other members.

I remember standing in the elevator with Alastair, after a Black Market performance in Frankfurt. We had been both blindfolded during the whole performance. Alastair said to me:

“I don’t know what happened, but it definitely was very good”. I knew what he meant to say.

But to me, the best Black Market performance was on the day that Boris and Kees celebrated their birthday in Breda. The party had not yet started then, but some people were already there, standing around a huge square table in Kees’ studio. I found a claw-hammer and threw it to Boris, who caught it and in the same move threw it to another person.

For the next half hour the hammer was flying around the space, spinning, thrown with effect or in an almost violent way. Not one time did it touch the ground.

It was beautiful.

Black Market International

Marco Teubner und Helge Meyer, Black Market International, Hildesheim 2000

‘BMI is a laboratorium.

BMI is meetings and images that I did not know before I go in.
BMI is a challenge and an exhausting task of awareness.
BMI is a time-sculpture.
BMI is an utopia of exchange’

Black Market Internationalwhat is BMI for me:

BMI is a place where I meet with people

BMI is a time I take to meet with people

BMI is a community with who I meet

BMI is the art of meeting

Ritual

Dieser Begriff hat sich zäh und scheinbar untrennbar mit dem der „Performance“ verknüpft – und speziell die Performances von BLACK MARKET scheinen ein günstiges Ziel dieser Zuschreibung zu sein. In welche Ecke sollte man denn auch sonst Szenen stecken, in denen schwarzgekleidete, barhäuptige Männer mittleren bis reiferen Alters hochkonzentriert dem Alltag enthobene Handlungen vollführen? In denen sie Requisiten benutzen die, trotz der nur noch rudimentär vorhandenen spirituellen Verbindlichkeit seitens der Zuschauergemeinschaft, einen hohen kultischen Wiedererkennungswert haben (Farbe, Feuer, Fisch), bzw. die durch eine entsprechend ernste und würdevolle Behandlung einen ebensolchen Status erhalten?

Der Rückgriff auf Vorstellungen wie Ritual oder, wie kürzlich bei Elisabeth Jappe in deren Vortrag anlässlich einer Performanceveranstaltung in Giswil, auf Schamanismus, ist dann nachvollziehbar, wenn man versteht, daß mit diesen Begriffen weniger der Bezug zu konkreten metaphysischen Praktiken als vielmehr die Zuordnung zu einem emotionalen Raum hergestellt werden soll, in den Erfahrungen mit Bildern oder Handlungen eingelagert sind, die man als „archaisch“ empfindet. Diese Bilder handeln  von der Kommunikation bzw. der „Chemie“ zwischen Mensch und Mensch, Mensch und Ding, Mensch und Geist.

Auch wenn sich viele Performancekünstler mit den aktuellen Erscheinungsformen dieser Phänomene beschäftigen, so wird die Verwendung dieser alten Begrifflichkeiten tunlichst vermieden. Sie sind in zu vielen Zusammenhängen gebraucht und entstellt worden, so daß sie, ohne eine Begriffsklärung, für den aktuellen Diskurs innerhalb der Performance Art nicht mehr taugen. Die Auseinandersetzung mit den Inhalten ist in einen entsprechend erweiterten Bildbegriff eingeflossen.

Bei BLACK MARKET sind es die beiden Prinzipien der Zusammenarbeit, die diese Punkte berühren:

1. Begegnung

Die Performance von BM hat als Grundlage und Voraussetzung die Idee von Begegnung. Individuelle und gesellschaftliche Auseinandersetzungen und die Vielzahl von öffentlichen und privaten Positionen schreiben sich prägend in die Struktur des Leibes ein. In einer künstlerischen Aktion kann sich daraus das Bild der Person entwickeln. Es ist dieses Bild das als Grundlage der Begegnung in die Performance eingebracht wird.

2. Aufmerksamkeit

Begegnung bedarf Aufmerksamkeit. Die unterschiedlichen Bilder der Performer schaffen ein gemeinsames Bild. Um dieses verstehen und verhandeln zu können bedarf es einer gewissen Konzentration, denn immerhin sind es mindestens acht Personen, die diese gemeinsame Situation schaffen. Die gleiche Bedeutung kommt Gegenständen zu, die eingebracht werden. Die zu beobachtende Langsamkeit in den Bewegungsabläufen der Performer ist dementsprechend weniger ein ästhetisches Stilmittel, als vielmehr die Folge der Bemühung um dieses gemeinsame Ereignis.

Es bleibt allerdings offen, weshalb bei einer so simplen Situation wie der zweier ruhig nebeinanderstehender Personen oder der eines gemächlichen Aufhängens von schwarzen Socken der Begriff von Ritual erscheint, weshalb diese Darstellungen als nicht nur belanglos empfunden werden, woher der Eindruck stammt, daß hier etwas Wesentliches geschieht. Diese Frage richtet sich nach dem Kompositionsprinzip, den Ideen oder Richtlinien aufgrund derer sich der Performer für diese eine Handlung oder für dieses eine Objekt entscheidet, weshalb er in dieser einen Art und Weise die Bewegung des gemeinsamen Bildes entwickeln möchte.

An diesem Punkt klärt sich die Besonderheit einer BLACK MARKET – Performance. Denn an sich ist es nichts Außergewöhnliches, wenn zwei oder mehrere Personen einen Raum betreten und sich gemäß vorher abgesprochenen Regeln zueinander in Beziehung setzen. Die Frage läßt sich auch nicht mit der Existenz von BM speziellen Arbeitsregeln beantworten, denn solche gibt es nicht. Nicht einmal das erläuterte Prinzip der Begegnung würde voraussichtlich von jedem Mitglied geteilt. Die Antwort liegt darin, daß es genau diese Künstler sind, die hier zusammengefunden haben; Künstler, die von den Persönlichkeiten her denkbar unterschiedlich sind, die aber alle, wenn auch unausgesprochen, eine gemeinsame Haltung, eine ähnliche Motivation hinsichtlich ihrer künstlerischen Arbeit teilen: Boris Nieslony nennt es mentales Netzwerk oder parallele Energie, man könnte es auch schlicht Sympathie oder eine grundsätzliche Gläubigkeit nennen. Ich könnte jedenfalls meine Motivation für die Entscheidung zu einer ganz bestimmten Handlung innerhalb einer BLACK MARKET -Performance nicht anders begründen, als mit dem Wunsch aus einer Position der Zuneigung heraus dieses gemeinsame Bild zu bereichern. Diese eigentümlich spirituelle künstlerische Haltung ist es, die für mich eine wesentliche Qualität in der Zusammenarbeit von BLACK MARKET darstellt.

Jürgen Fritz

Frankfurt, im Oktober 1998

Die Prinzipien der Zusammenarbeit - Boris Nieslony
Prinzipien der Zusammenarbeit

B.M. ist der Name für eine Form der Zusammenarbeit einiger europäischer Performance- und Theaterkünstler. Sie treten nicht als Gruppe im herkömmlichen Sinne auf, erarbeiten keine Stücke, keine Themen.

B.M. ist aus Prinzip kein Eigentum; ist ein offenes System der Begegnung. Die Richtung, der Ablauf jeder Performance wird durch jeden Teilnehmer oder Gast bestimmt und beeinflußt.

B.M. ist ein Ereignis. Der Zustand, in dem eine Anzahl von Künstlern in einem bestimmten Raum, in einer bestimmten Zeit parallel ihre Performance aus- und vorführen.

B.M. ist eine künstlerische Idee, eine kulturübergreifende Wahlverwandtschaft.

B.M. entsteht dadurch, daß die beteiligten Künstler sich in einen ,,Raum” stellen, sich in Handlungen einfügen, sie beginnen und beenden, ihr entwickeltes Repertoire darstellen und ausspielen, zur Verfügung stellen. In der Performance ist die typische Präsens eines Künstlers, ,,seine Handlungsweise” Ursache und Grund der Begegnung.

B.M. ist ein Prinzip mit ethnisch-kultureller Dimension, die sich ,,in Bildern hinter den Bildern vor dem Bild” äußert. Dieser Raum ist das zu bildende ,,Dazwischen”.

B.M. verbindet Zeit als gestaltetes Ereignis mit elementarem Dasein. In der Performance werden Objekte (uns helfende Gegenstände) als gleichwertige Performer mit dem Repertoire der Handlungsbilder ins Spiel gebracht.

B.M. ist als Prinzip ein Erforschen von Aufmerksamkeit. In der Performance geschieht die Aufmerksamkeit nicht als offensichtliche Meditation, eher als Instinkt, als Treffsicherheit. Aus der Vielfalt des Geschehenden wird das gewählt, das jetzt und in diesem Moment die innere Bildung in der Zeit gewährleistet.

B.M. weiß, daß das absolute Alleinsein in der Handlung das konzentrierte Gemeinsame ermöglicht.

B.M. läßt das Paradox enstehen, daß das, was zu sehen ist, nicht das ist, was gesehen wird. Die Performance zeigt, wie gewisse Erfahrungen, Erkenntniszustände nicht festgehalten werden können. ,,Nicht-Gegenwärtiges wiederholen, da es nie Gegenwart wird”. Die Performance stellt ein Ereignis dar, das als Modell gesellschaftlicher Begegnung ,,Berührung” skizziert. Während, und nach der Performance wird diese Skizze verworfen. Das Ereignis wird sich jeweils neu entwerfen. Die Skizze ermöglicht durch wechselnde Teilnehmer und unterschiedene Orte dem Ereignis Dauer.

B.M. hat als Handlungsstruktur Objekte, die mit Erfahrungen, Ideen oder desgleichen besetzt sind. Mikroemotionen ist das Werkzeug der Handlung, der Umgang und das Spiel.

B.M. ist wie ,,Die Alchemie und alle bildende Künste eine virtuelle Kunst”, die ihren Sinn wie ihre Wirklichkeit nicht in sich selbst tragen. ,,Quanten springen aus dem Quantensee, Delphine tanzen aus dem Meer für Sekunden und verschwinden wieder in der Tiefe. So manifestieren sich künstlerische Prinzipien in der Realität und erzeugen Zeit und Dauer durch Erinnern. (A. Artaud)

B.M. ist in der Gestaltung des ,,MA”, des Zwischenraumes, dieses Nichts, eine Art geistigen Betretenseins.

B.M. ist performativ. Als menschliche Handlung zielt sie auf Wirkung durch Übertragung, ist analogisch. Die Performance gestaltet die verschiedenen Wertsetzungen der Teilnehmer und der Gäste. In der Geschichte der Rituale verankert ist sie doch davon weit entfernt als Ritual bezeichnet zu werden.

B.M. zeigt im Prinzip, daß alles möglich ist. Konsequenterweise reduziert sich für die Ausführenden das Wissen der Möglichkeiten, was zu tun ist, auf ein Minimum. Das immaterielle Zentrum der Performance, jeder Begegnung, das gemeinsame Wissen ist: Das Zwischen-den-Menschen; Das Zwischen-den-Dingen; Das Wissen über den Ton, die Temperatur, die Frequenz, die Nähe und Ferne und all die unaussprechlichen Dinge des Herzens.B.M. steht in der Tradition verschiedener europäischer ,,Networks” der letzten

15 Jahre und vermerkt mit Respekt wie folgt:

  • Todays Place
  • The Prediction
  • Reindeer Werk
  • Das Konzil
  • Werkzeuggruppe des Konzil
  • Minus delta t
  • East-West-Study-Project
  • Aufmerksamkeitsschule
  • Verein für Projektkunst eV.

B.M. treibt Anthropognosie

B.M. ist neben ,,ASA-European“ und „The Current Affairs“ ein weiteres europäisches Network.

15 principles of Black Market International by Michael LaChance

15 principles of Black Market International

By Michael LaChance

The performances of BMI are exercises in derision and concentration, sacralisation and effacement. The performers try to take life seriously yet demonstrating that is worth very little, that it is held by a gesture, that is played in a moment. It is hard to describe that gesture, to say what it should look like, yet we recognize it as soon as we see it. We are familiar with metaphysics more that we want to admit and that is why we can recognize the fundamental moments of existence without even knowing what it’s about – in an epoch where the acceptance of performance as an artistic practice is not yet in the dictionaries. That is the work of BMI: create fundamental moments. And it is our job to find out why and how. In this article, we will tell you about the solo BMI performances through 15 basic principles.

The 1st principle of BMI

is the privilege of encounter. The art of encounter becomes a politic of comunitas. The members don’t have a common theme; they work in open cooperation, even if it’s not often that they are produced collectively. The title Black Market (1985) is not a group but ideas at work. Each performance must set up a singular space-time complex, exhuming the structure of encounter, which is genealogically the origin of what we call “space”. The body is sublimes in space. There is also an experience of human relation that has been deposited in what seems today like an empty frame: the abstract notion of time-space. A BMI performance seeks an encounter so that we may reappropriate space and draw the invisible links that make it up. Lee Wen makes visual contact with the public, and then does a ritual in which he takes small stones and bounces them on his head. Then he eats a handful of red peppers, leaving the audience in awe. We are attracted to him and the tears in his eyes make the silence more enveloping… Wen shows his capacity of being detached from himself, yet maintaining self-control. He seems to be saying: all our identities are false.

The 2nd principle

is the diversity of initial impulses. Each member can bring his own impulse. A BMI event can host guests that will bring their own impulse, but the initial autonomy must hold its course; the performer is a vehicle for experimentation. Elvira S. wants to get on a bus without paying, negotiating the fare with a small duck, asking the driver to be her accomplice. It is the idea of the singularity of gratuity (“only this time”). The impulse is accentuated by the resistance that is provoked, and by the possibilities of eventual negotiations.

The 3rd principle

is the parallelism of performances. We can imagine many actors on the same stage, each one reciting his own play. The happening-condition reminds us of the human condition, each one being absorbed by his own existence, each one unraveling the thread of his own existence. There is nothing in common between Alastair M. nailing fish on the wall and Roi V. writing a spiral of words on the ground. One thing is sure and it is that we must not link the interventions because it would reduce them to “episodes”. The performances enable us to see forms of life that would otherwise go unnoticed – they are “language games” (Wittgenstein)

The 4th principle

of BMI is that it is only an artistic idea, a creative hypothesis that could not be founded on certainties that must be verified in upcoming projects that need links that are not based on our cultural backgrounds. We must then choose links (structural, affective…) beyond our cultural limits. Another way of saying that out familiar world is made of a tight web of conventional links, and all things are connected to each other in the consolidation of the evidence of the world (I didn’t understand this part!!! I skip it!). With this 4th principle, BMI is conceived as a federative idea (European inspired): a mutual political and economic union that respects the cultural specificity of each member. Within this union, the cultural differences are marked but they do not risk to be menaced by concerted actions. The political dimension must be assumed: the performer must reflect on the type of relationship he wants to have with his public. Each action questions the responsibilities of the artist and of the public which, in a given situation, has a drawing force and manifests an adhesion to the event in all its ethical and political implications. In Helge M.’s relationship with his public, a unstated contract is passed: “All the clothing I wear are the result of an exchange (in a past festival in the Philippines) I must exchange them all with you today!” When it came to the last item, feminine underwear, and the public had to decide collectively about this symbolic process of nudity of the artist, whether or not to permit the complete success of the exchange protocol. The systematic character of the unraveling of the action and the quality of the interpersonal relationship in which the exchange is done contributes to the degree of response of the public. So Meyer’s mechanism is a link in an international transmission chain: the group from Le Lieu became solidary with the Philippines group. And more, each piece of clothing having a history, each spectator discovers how much his clothing is related to his own cultural universe. All this pushed an audacious spectator to come and give up his underwear in front of everybody in exchange for a black lace string that Helge M. had succeeded in putting on. Thanks to this last audacious act, all the process was ratified, and the public confirmed its ability to conclude the “procedural” contract and overcome idiosyncratic prudery. The spectators are not only people who are asked to be there, they participate in an action and become performers. Helge M. can go to his next festival with a bunch of Québécois clothing. Let’s hope he will find someone who will accept to take them.

The 5th BMI principle

is that the artist must adjust his presence in the way he feels the space, and in the way he creates a duration in time through his actions. This is an existential statement that deals with the quality of the presence and the specificity of the staging of the present. Ideally, the event that assembles performer and public should have no content or reason other than this “typical presence” that characterizes the artist, signaling an ontic event really taking place. Roi Vaara, elegant in his evening suit, starts his performance putting an alarm clock on the floor. Then he writes a series of words on the floor in a spiral. Once it is done, he swirls around and falls. He lights a cigarette and gets up, goes along the spiral in the other direction cancelling the words and replacing them by others. This performance magisterially illustrates the construction of space (the spiral) and time (the double movement centripede and centrifuge, systole and diastole), a space-time constructed hic and nunc. This vertiginal spiral of our time makes Roi V. loose his equilibrium. SO he has the good idea of changing the terms: fate (choice) etc…..

The 6th BMI principle

is that the whole process must not end in a synthesis (a demonstration, a moral…), the event’s indetermination must be maintained. A direct consequence of this indetermination is that hope remains in circuit because the virtuality of the presence is not completely actualized. BMI is an event without terms, produced within events that leave us waiting for something to follow, waking up the sense of community in the hope of a future world: recognizing in ourselves a thirst for the absolute (vodka hahaha), : recognizing in ourselves the hidden hope for a better world… Performance must give the most tangible manifestation of hope, must make hope gush like and energy flowing out of immateriality. Boris N., almost nude, rolls on the gravel holding a stone to his breast. Rolling stone gathers no moss? He underlines his nakedness in a poetical action that is close to the definition that Cage gave to poetry: a “celebration of the fact that we own nothing”. It is like acts of meditation and telluric incantation, when the stone becomes the nexus of a mental concentration, a meditative exercise that transforms the gravel of any parking lot into something as precious as the Ryoanji Zen garden in Kyoto. A car with the headlights on follows him… How can the spectator abandon himself before the “unraveling” of this performance? He can evaluate the distance covered, the speed of the movement and thus the time. He can forget himself in this temporality by projecting himself in the performer’s body (when one thinks that it must be more painful in the elbows than in the shoulders), by projecting himself into the enigmatic gravel that gives a theological aura to the event. The viewer moves along to follow the action, he is attracted by the stone that accumulates presence, when Nieslony shows that the effective daily being-alive of man, despite all the mediation of our “spectacularized” society, can be re-centered in a harder core.

The 7th BMI principle

is that time is not dissociable from the elementary presence of the artist with the public, when both negotiate each other’s presence. Since Fluxus, MACIUNAS was looking for “monostructural qualities…of a natural simple event”. It’s a rule of unity. This is why it is important to set a specific duration: the time of the basic event, from which we take conscience of others, element in which we get closer to each other but also in which we practice exclusion. The presence is overthrown by the passage of time because the situation is precarious and the participants are mortal. In the flux of time, objects and living people are all temporal actors, inert objects can become useful actors, and in fact they can become performers of equal value as the live ones. Cage had already discovered that all objects can “become Duchamp”. All stones, as long as they are willing to roll along with us on the gravel, would be Nieslony. With Norbert K., the flux of pedestrians walking on the sidewalk across the street from Le Lieu and that we can see through the window to his left and to his right, give the rhythm of time. The street life becomes a discreet actor in the performance. The performer throws flowers – symbol of the corruptible character of all things in time, he blows a white balloon – using breath as a component of the duration of the operation. Covered in a black veil, he passes a red thread from left to right, identifying himself with the three Parcae. There is no duration to this piece; the piece is nothing but this duration that unwinds in different ways.

The 8th principle of BMI is

the exploration of ethnic and cultural dimensions that are lost in the usual tracking we do by using the most current ethno cultural markings. These aspects do not appear on the map on which we would like to frame the diversity of our times. A better knowledge of cultural territories enables us to trace the borders and to play with overlapping of cultures, hybridization and crossbreeding. We find a widening of the intermedia project that Dick Higgins is keen on, towards “interstitial” productions, intercultural poetics. Alastair M.’s performances deals with objects whose connotation is specific to certain regions: in Northern Ireland, an individual with a nylon stocking on his head that nails mackerels to the wall, doesn’t give the same impression as in, let’s say Italy. M. proposes an installation: on the wall (three small plastic ducks, three mackerels) and all the material on the floor, need an interpretation, just like the door through which he finally disappears.

The 9th BMI principle

is that performance is an investigation of forms of attention, from the reflective or meditative attention to a purely instinctive attention. This instinct enables us to recognize instantly “what must be”, what corresponds to the right unwinding of the event, to the natural traveling of time. But we are not familiar with the logic of the event, we cannot narrate its course – it stems from an inner knowledge that is like the analogon of the structural unity of the world. Or it stems from the world that knows itself through us.

The 10th BMI principle

is that all must occur in life. Here, we find Robert Filiou’s exhortation: “Art is where you live”. Art must be founded in life and merge with life so that in return life can take hold on art: esthetics must open the road of ethics. So the art of performance knows no limits, so life surfaces in its reinvented project, offering through its decisive actions, the impression of truth. Nieslony tries to create daily koan on life’s synopsis (Daily Life Plots Koan)

The 11th BMI principle

stipulates that it is in the heart of total solitude that we can find the greatest concentration that we can reach the utmost and accomplished being-entity. We think of Lee Wen’s solitude holding on to his stool to absorb the shock of his peppers, Nieslony’s solitude in which he realizes that the stone is his ally.

The 12th BMI principle

aims at maintaining performance in an ontological paradox: the ambivalence of being and non-being, of visible and invisible – trying to give form to a third element, that of a differed existence, of a constantly imminent emergence. A lot of our experiences and perceptions are not stored because they don’t seem to contribute positively to our dichotomous and positivistic perception of the world. However we must find these experiences again, recognize them as sketches of another world, or of a multiplicity of worlds: as dreams dreaming themselves. Performance enables us to seize these experiences and perceptions, and to organize them according to what Daniel Charles calls “insular or compartmental structurations, rather than informative o sequential”.

The 13th BMI principle

is performativity. Performance, as seen by BMI, is not the search for a greater technical or utilitarian efficacy; it is neither the development of a narrative knowledge that may challenge the great tales of modernity, as in Lyotard’s proposed alternative. It is the performativity of a direct transmission, where saying is doing and doing is saying. In direct performativity – as in “direct provocation” – the discourse and the action merge: a thought or a word surfaces from the action, and it is a thought or a word that must become action. When accomplished, the word no longer has to be said, it becomes a virtuality of silence. Another aspect of performativity: when the literal and the figurative combine, the performative encounter will be positive and through manipulation, symbols will be either desecrated or sacralized. It is like this when Jacques V.P. makes believe he is regimenting his public, buries his flag, distributes fetishist objects, all with the help of a translator called Nathalie, in an action interspersed with the reading of chapters of Tao te King. And in the finale, a well-known Gilbert Bécaud song about a pretty guide in Moscow is played. As if we could hear this song only through the present situation we are living.

The 14th BMI principle

is that we must stay away from common language; we must practice a game of non-communicative provocations that create in the end a deficit of interpretation, a hearing hindrance, and a spiritual embarrassment. Pro-vocation: provocare, “call (vocare) out”, place the voice outside, towards the outside. It is rather an ante-vocation, a call from inside. Auto-exhortation. The BMI performance, which has only a few vocal effects from the verbal sphere, suggest the passage from a verbal communication to a communication from self to self, self-oriented through vital energy. This concerns first of all the performer, who is carrying out a scenic activity disjointed from the reactions and participation of the public. Moments of energy that concern only him: Boris N. did not only carry a heavy stone, he made a crowd disappear, allowing it to become something else. On the gravel, under the highway, Nieslony is holding onto a piece of absoluteness. In fact, he is an admirer of Martin Buber, who said: “The words of he who wants to speak with human beings without speaking with God will not be accomplished; but the words of he who wants to speak with God without speaking with man will be lost”.

The 15th BMI principle

is that all is possible. The simple fact of reminding this during a performance means inciting shock. It is putting on us the weight of the immensity of reality. Then, the room seems small, the action seems trifling, and our knowledge seems useless. The only thing we must know is that the real form of a work of art is its approaching the other, and its true color, its attraction, its impact etc., all this has no place except in the people. When Roi V., sweating and panting, comes back from his vertigo, he tries to light a cigarette, but his lighter doesn’t work. Someone from the public comes up with another lighter, but Vaara crossly throws it out. We don’t leave a chance to possibilities because we determine from moment to moment what it should be!

Vortragsperformance - Jürgen Fritz

JÜRGEN FRITZ

VORTRAGSPERFORMANCE

zu der Reihe Performance Art in NRW, vorgetragen am 14.03.1997

Performances in der Art, wie sie von BLACK MARKET vorgestellt werden, sind … out.

Das ist, zumindest sinngemäß, eine Feststellung in dem im vorigen Jahr erschienenen und vielbeachteten Buch mit dem Titel Performance von Marvin Carlson, einem Professor für Performance an der City University in N.Y… Demnach habe sich die Performance seit den 90ern generell in zwei Richtungen entwickelt: Einen hauptsächlichen Trend in der Performance Art sieht Carlson in der Rückkehr zu Text bzw. zu bewußt theatralen, textbezogenen lnszenierungen, wie beispielsweise bei der Woostergroup, Spalding Gray oder Laurie Anderson. Er zitiert in diesem Zusammenhang eine neue New Yorker Performancerichtung, die 1995 in verschiedenen cafes der Stadt “in” war: “rap meets poetry”.

Mit dieser Rückkehr des Textes hätte sich tatsächlich die grundsätzliche Anti-Haltung der Performance Art gegenüber dem Theater aufgelöst. Diese Abgrenzung gegenüber jeglicher Form von dramatischer Struktur und psychologisch fundierter Dynamik, wie sie zumindest dem traditionellen Theater eigen ist, wurde 1970 in einer Diskussionsrunde um Alan Kaprow als wesentliches Merkmal der Performance Art definiert. Zu diesem Kreis um Kaprow gehörten auch Vito Acconci, Yvonne Rainer und Joan Jonas 1.

Eine weitere dominierende Entwicklung sei das sogenannte “Theater der Bilder”, wie es beispielsweise von Bob Wilson, oder, durch dessen Vorbild, von Laurie Anderson 2 initiiert worden ist. Es ist offensichtlich, daß es wesentliche Unterschiede gibt, vergleicht man die Performanceshows von Wilson, Anderson, der Wooster Group, die neueren Vorstellungen von Marina Abramovic oder auch die der BAK-Truppen mit den Performances, die in diesem Jahr hier vorgestellt werden. Doch diese Unterschiede liegen meiner Ansicht nach weniger darin, daß die einen mehr text- oder bilderbezogen bezogen sind, und die anderen sich vielleicht mehr aus der Tradition der 70er Jahre herleiten lassen.

Der Unterschied liegt im Begriff der Inszenierung und deren Implikationen. Und auch hier denke ich nicht an Authentizität (ein guter Schauspieler kann ungeheur authentisch sein) oder an die Forderung nach Einmaligkeit, die oft als wichtiges Merkmal von Performance Art benannt wird.

Aktion

Ich habe vor drei Wochen einen wunderbaren Vortrag von einem Schweizer Professor namens Groß gehört, der damit anfing, daß er ja einen vorbereiteten Vortrag dabei habe, er jetzt aber keine Lust habe diesen vorzutragen, sondern lieber über etwas anderes sprechen möchte, und er fing an darüber zu erzählen, wie er am Vormittag die Umgebung des Vortragsortes abgeschritten sei, was er so alles gesehen habe – nämlich viele Geschäfte mit Computern und deren Zubehör und fast in jedem Gäßchen, das er passiert habe – ein ausrangiertes Plüschsofa – und damit war er beim Thema. In den Wohnzimmern weiche die Bequemlichkeit des roten Samts der Hart-ware des Computerzeitalters.

Das hat mir sehr imponiert. Das war offensichtlich eine Art der richtigen Rede – eine echte nicht Performance sondern Performanz – mit ‘z’ – eine gelungene Rede – deren Gelingen erst einmal vollkommen unabhängig davon ist, worüber geredet wird – sondern nur davon, wie man das tut.

Was hat Herr Groß gemacht? Er wählte im richtigen Augenblick die richtigen Worte und das richtige Verhalten – kurz, er handelte richtig. Es ist diese Form des Handelns und der freien Rede, welche ursprünglich 3 die einzigen Möglichkeiten von politischer Tätigkeit darstellten. Jede andere Tätigkeit war von der Notwendigkeit des Lebens vorgegeben, konnte nicht frei gewählt werden, und unterschied damit den Menschen nicht von anderen Lebewesen. Nur die freie Rede und die Handlung waren demzufoge nur dem Menschen eigen, und waren damit die einzigen Möglichkeiten, Mensch unter Menschen zu sein.

Selbstverständlich war der, in meinem Beispiel genannte Professor einem bestimmten Druck ausgesetzt, er war eingeladen worden und hatte eine Rede zu halten, für die er sich auch ein Konzept zurechtgelegt hatte. Aber er hatte sich davon befreit – er hattte sein Konzept weggelassen und im Moment der Rede andere Worte gewählt.

An dieser Idee von Handlung, oder der freien, richtigen Rede wird auch der Unterschied einer Performance von BLACK MARKET zu einer theatralen Inszenierung bzw. zu einer Performance-Show deutlich: Die Performer von BLACK MARKET bringen keine fertigen Stücke sondern nur Material mit, das möglicherweise benutzt wird. Es gibt nur minimale Absprachen, was den Verlauf der Performance, bzw. die Gestaltung des Performanceortes betrifft. Erst im Moment der Performance wählt der Performer sein Material und entscheidet, wie er es einsetzt.

Im zweiten Handbuch von BLACK MARKET heißt es dazu:

“BLACK MARKET zeigt im Prinzip, daß alles möglich ist. Konsequenterweise reduziert sich für die Ausführenden das Wissen der Möglichkeiten, was zu tun ist, auf ein Minimum. Aus der Vielfalt des Geschehenden wird das gewählt, das jetzt und in diesem Moment die innere Bildung in der Zeit gewährleistet.”

Aktion

Bei einigen Indianerstämmen Nordamerikas gab es ein Fest mit dem Namen Potlatsch. Es wurden viele Geschenke verteilt, aber auch Wertgegenstände zerstört. Nicht als agressive Geste, sondern um unter dem Zeichen der Verschwendung den Charakter einer richtigen Gabe zu offenbaren. Es gibt grundsätzlich zwei Möglichkeiten der Gabe: bei der Einen gibt der Mächtige dem Unterstellten und unterstreicht mit dieser Demonstration seinen sozialen Rang. Die andere ist, wie die richtige Rede, vollkommen frei von irgendeiner Zweckgebundenheit. Es ist eine Handlung als Mensch unter Menschen.

Aktion

Wer versteht oder beurteilt, ob eine Handlung eine “richtige” war oder nicht? Diejenigen, die diese Handlung ausüben, und diejenigen, die ihr beigewohnt haben, im Falle einer Vorstellung das Publikum.

Eine Performance vermag “communitas” herzustellen. Communitas ist, der Ethnologie zu Folge, eine Gemeinschaft; eine außerhalb der momentan geltenden Sozialstruktur, außerhalb der momentan geltenden gesellschaftlichen Verhaltensnormen spontan entstehende, auf unbegrenztem gegenseitigem Verstehen basierende Gemeinschaft.

Jeder kennt diese Momente, in denen man das Gefühl hat, man sei eins mit allen und allem; es ist eine Art instinktives, luzides Eintauchen in das, was Martin Buber als wesenhaftes “Wir” bezeichnet 4 . Ein Erlebnis, das einer Erleuchtung gleichkommt.

Man kann annehmen, das jeder spirituellen Gemeinschaft, jeder Utopie von Gesellschaft der Versuch zu Grunde liegt, diese persönliche Erfahrung von communitas in ein Regelsystem zu übertragen, in der diese als besonders “wahrhaftig” empfundene Form der Interaktion zur Grundlage des Zusammenlebens werden soll.

Victor Turner, einer der führenden Theoretiker der Performance im ethnologischen Sinne, schreibt dazu Folgendes:

“Menschen, die in Form spontaner Communitas miteinander agieren, werden total von einem einzelnen, durch » Fluß« (Verschmelzen von Handlung und Bewußtsein) geprägten Ereignis absorbiert.”5

Und hierin ist der utopische Entwurf aber auch die Möglichkeit des Scheiterns der Idee BLACK MARKET zu finden: Spontane communitas, die durch theoretische Konzepte in ideologische, oder durch ein Regelsystem in normative communitas übertragen wird, verwandelt sich in Zwang, und verunmöglicht geradezu das Entstehen einer neuerlichen spontanen Situation.

Um dem zu entgehen, versucht BLACK MARKET keinen Stil aber auch keine Abgrenzung gegenüber anderen Stilen festzuschreiben, sondern versucht ein offenes, ständig wechselndes System der Begegnung als Plattform der künstlerischen Arbeit anzubieten.

Zbigniew Warpechowski hat nach der ersten Performancereihe von BLACK MARKET folgendes dazu geschrieben:

“… Einige Monate nach dieser Reihe von verschiedenen Performances, dieser Reise, kann ich folgendes zu meinen Erfahrungen sagen: Der geistige Dialog, der gemeinsame Versuch, geistigen Kontakt aufzunehmen, setzt gute Vorbereitung, innere Einstellung und bewußte Isolierung, Geschlossenheit, Ausscheiden aus der Normalität des Alltags und seiner Bedingungen voraus. Ebenso Ablehnung aller Zwänge und Kontakte nach außen. Zugleich bedeutet das: der Verzicht auf Egoismus, Konkurrenz, Bevorzugung, Ränke oder Ähnliches. Die Zeit dieser Isolation kann so lange dauern bis jeder ‘keinen Weg’ mehr weiß. Jeder braucht seine Zeit, um aus seinem eigenen psychischen Rhythmus herauszutreten und in den gemeinsamen Rhythmus des ‘Nicht Sein’, der zwanglosen Zustimmung für ‘BEDEUTUNGS-LOSIGKEIT’ überzugehen. Das bedeutet Aufhebung des ‘Künstler – Sein’ und: Aktionen in der Kunst. Diese Voraussetzungen können nicht dauernd eingehalten werden und sind auch nicht dauernd erfüllt worden…

Die Bedeutung von BLACK MARKET kann als ‘Erfolg’ oder ‘gescheitert angesehen werden, nicht aber als Erlebnis ‘Black Market’ mit seinen transzendentalen Erscheinungen…”

Zbigniew Warpechowski 6.

Aktion

Jede Art der Handlung oder der richtigen Rede ist grundsätzlich monologisch, und geschieht auch in einer temporären Gemeinschaft wie BLACK MARKET als paralleler Monolog. Doch die Performance entsteht als das Mehr aus der Summe der Monologe im “Dazwischen”. Peter Brook untersucht es als das “in between”, beispielsweise als das zu gestaltende “Zwischen dem Schauspieler und dem Zuschauer”, in der japanischen Kunsttheorie ist es das “MA”, auf das der einzelne Akteur nicht direkt zugreifen kann. Er kann nur versuchen, eine Situation zu schaffen, sie zu bewegen, mit ihr zu spielen, sich in sie hinein- oder aus ihr hinaus zu bewegen, in der die Performance als Bild der Begegnung entsteht.

Im zweiten Heft von BLACK MARKET schreibt Boris Nieslony dazu:

“Das immaterielle Zentrum der Performance, jeder Begegnung, das gemeinsame Wissen ist: das Zwischen-den-Menschen; Das Zwischen-den-Dingen; Das Wissen über den Ton, die Frequenz, die Nähe und Ferne und all die unaussprechlichen Dinge des Herzens 7.

Schlußaktion

  1. Marvin Carlson: Performance. Routledge, 1996. S. 106
  2. L.. Anderson seit 1976 durch Glass’ und Wilsons Einstein on the Beach dazu inspiriert worden, ihre bis dato kleindimensionierten Stücke zu großen Multimediaswows wie United States weiterzuentwickeln. Carlson S. 114
  3. Im Sinne Aristoteles wie in der Nikomachische Ethik, Buch I,5 dargelegt. Zitiert in Hannah Arendt: Vita Activa, Serie Piper, 1994. S. 144ff und Anmerkungen S. 319
  4. Martin Buber in: Ich und Du, 1923
  5. Victor Turner: Vom Ritual zum Theater, Fischer, 1995, S. 74
  6. Zbigniew Warpechowski in: BLACK-MARKET – Performances, Hrsg.: Neue Galerie Kassel, Verlag Michael Kellner, Hamburg, 1986
  7. Boris Nieslony in: BLACK-MARKET – Performance, Heft 2, Hrsg. Black Market International

Myriam Laplante
Black Market International

Myriam Laplante, Black Market International, National Review of Live Art, NRLA, 2007, Photo Silvie Ferré

Working in a BMI performance for me is like entering a different dimension, a parallel reality where anything can happen but also where I can blindly trust everybody involved, in such a way that it is possible to challenge the laws of gravity, of time, of matter, of art, of performance.

Alastair MacLennan
Black Market International

Alastair MacLennan, Black Market International, Bon 8, Bern, Schweiz, 2005, Photographer Martin Rindlisbacher

Black

Alastair MacLennan

 

Black Market’s most interesting work (to the artist) comes through

the marginal, the unexpected, no conventional staging, or seated audiences

‘ordinary’ living situations (with their treble, quadruple twists) extremes of success and failure work invoking real (not symbolic or metaphoric) doubt, wonder and awe

the use of actual danger (physical and mental), contradiction and ‘artlessness’ concern with political, social and cultural malfunction

victims (and how)

bottoming out of values

splintering of whole Systems

feeding from life, not frozen cultural forms

being simultaneously opposite and not – (three’s company, two a crowd)

siting work out of traditional spaces, theatres, galleries, museums, concert halls, re-activating the concept of pilgrimage

getting there being part of the work unfixing the fixity of text

working from cracks in old vessels

making work from gaps in new systems

using the potential of distortion through mediation what does and doesn’t collapse in on itself

uncertainty as subject and object matter

linking up inter regionally, globally (not internationally) making art without ‘artists’

making ‘nothing’ engaging, entertaining and provocative eschewing artifice

promoting work which shows faith in the present

while surfing through post-modernism, locating pre-modern archetypes within fusing actual and virtual time/spaces

endeavouring to realise I work from the unimageable.

Zbigniew Warpechowski
Black Market International

Zbwigniew Warpechowski, Empedokles, Black Market International, documenta 9, 1992, Photo Thomas Rosenthal

A few months after this series of different performances, this journey, I can say the following about my experience:
Spiritual dialogue, the common attempt to establish spiritual contact, presupposes good preparation, inner attitude and conscious isolation, closure, leaving behind the normaIity of everyday life and its conditions. and its conditions. Likewise, rejection of all pressures and contacts with the outside world.

At the same time, this means renouncing egoism, competition, favouritism, intrigue and the like. The time of this isolation can last until everyone knows “no way”. Everyone needs time to step out of their own psychic rhythm and into the common rhythm of “not-being”, of unconstrained consent for “MEANINGLESSNESS”. This implies suspension of “being-an-artist” and: Actions in art. These conditions cannot be fulfilled permanently and have not been fulfilled permanently.
The meaning of “Black Market” can be seen as success or failure, but not as the Black Market Experience with its transcendental phenomena.

Zbigniew Warpechowski

Jacques van Poppel
Black Market International

Jacques van Poppel, Black Market International, Bone 8, Bern, Schweiz, 2005, Photographer Martin Rindlisbacher

Hammer

Black Market, yes Black Market.

Why do I keep thinking of Mack Blarket?

To me Black Market is an attitude. Also there is a group of artists, calling themselves “Black Market International”.

International? Good good question. Now suppose I would leave this group of artists, would that mean that I am out of Black Market?

Or, was I not in, until I became a member of this group? I think not.. -I think Black Market has nothing to do with me. Nor has it with the other members.

I remember standing in the elevator with Alastair, after a Black Market performance in Frankfurt. We had been both blindfolded during the whole performance. Alastair said to me:

“I don’t know what happened, but it definitely was very good”. I knew what he meant to say.

But to me, the best Black Market performance was on the day that Boris and Kees celebrated their birthday in Breda. The party had not yet started then, but some people were already there, standing around a huge square table in Kees’ studio. I found a claw-hammer and threw it to Boris, who caught it and in the same move threw it to another person.

For the next half hour the hammer was flying around the space, spinning, thrown with effect or in an almost violent way. Not one time did it touch the ground.

It was beautiful.

Helge Meyer/Marco Teubner
Black Market International

Marco Teubner und Helge Meyer, Black Market International, Hildesheim 2000

‘BMI is a laboratorium.

BMI is meetings and images that I did not know before I go in.
BMI is a challenge and an exhausting task of awareness.
BMI is a time-sculpture.
BMI is an utopia of exchange’
Julie Andrée T.

Black Market Internationalwhat is BMI for me:

BMI is a place where I meet with people

BMI is a time I take to meet with people

BMI is a community with who I meet

BMI is the art of meeting

Ritual - Jürgen Fritz

Ritual

Dieser Begriff hat sich zäh und scheinbar untrennbar mit dem der „Performance“ verknüpft – und speziell die Performances von BLACK MARKET scheinen ein günstiges Ziel dieser Zuschreibung zu sein. In welche Ecke sollte man denn auch sonst Szenen stecken, in denen schwarzgekleidete, barhäuptige Männer mittleren bis reiferen Alters hochkonzentriert dem Alltag enthobene Handlungen vollführen? In denen sie Requisiten benutzen die, trotz der nur noch rudimentär vorhandenen spirituellen Verbindlichkeit seitens der Zuschauergemeinschaft, einen hohen kultischen Wiedererkennungswert haben (Farbe, Feuer, Fisch), bzw. die durch eine entsprechend ernste und würdevolle Behandlung einen ebensolchen Status erhalten?

Der Rückgriff auf Vorstellungen wie Ritual oder, wie kürzlich bei Elisabeth Jappe in deren Vortrag anlässlich einer Performanceveranstaltung in Giswil, auf Schamanismus, ist dann nachvollziehbar, wenn man versteht, daß mit diesen Begriffen weniger der Bezug zu konkreten metaphysischen Praktiken als vielmehr die Zuordnung zu einem emotionalen Raum hergestellt werden soll, in den Erfahrungen mit Bildern oder Handlungen eingelagert sind, die man als „archaisch“ empfindet. Diese Bilder handeln  von der Kommunikation bzw. der „Chemie“ zwischen Mensch und Mensch, Mensch und Ding, Mensch und Geist.

Auch wenn sich viele Performancekünstler mit den aktuellen Erscheinungsformen dieser Phänomene beschäftigen, so wird die Verwendung dieser alten Begrifflichkeiten tunlichst vermieden. Sie sind in zu vielen Zusammenhängen gebraucht und entstellt worden, so daß sie, ohne eine Begriffsklärung, für den aktuellen Diskurs innerhalb der Performance Art nicht mehr taugen. Die Auseinandersetzung mit den Inhalten ist in einen entsprechend erweiterten Bildbegriff eingeflossen.

Bei BLACK MARKET sind es die beiden Prinzipien der Zusammenarbeit, die diese Punkte berühren:

1. Begegnung

Die Performance von BM hat als Grundlage und Voraussetzung die Idee von Begegnung. Individuelle und gesellschaftliche Auseinandersetzungen und die Vielzahl von öffentlichen und privaten Positionen schreiben sich prägend in die Struktur des Leibes ein. In einer künstlerischen Aktion kann sich daraus das Bild der Person entwickeln. Es ist dieses Bild das als Grundlage der Begegnung in die Performance eingebracht wird.

2. Aufmerksamkeit

Begegnung bedarf Aufmerksamkeit. Die unterschiedlichen Bilder der Performer schaffen ein gemeinsames Bild. Um dieses verstehen und verhandeln zu können bedarf es einer gewissen Konzentration, denn immerhin sind es mindestens acht Personen, die diese gemeinsame Situation schaffen. Die gleiche Bedeutung kommt Gegenständen zu, die eingebracht werden. Die zu beobachtende Langsamkeit in den Bewegungsabläufen der Performer ist dementsprechend weniger ein ästhetisches Stilmittel, als vielmehr die Folge der Bemühung um dieses gemeinsame Ereignis.

Es bleibt allerdings offen, weshalb bei einer so simplen Situation wie der zweier ruhig nebeinanderstehender Personen oder der eines gemächlichen Aufhängens von schwarzen Socken der Begriff von Ritual erscheint, weshalb diese Darstellungen als nicht nur belanglos empfunden werden, woher der Eindruck stammt, daß hier etwas Wesentliches geschieht. Diese Frage richtet sich nach dem Kompositionsprinzip, den Ideen oder Richtlinien aufgrund derer sich der Performer für diese eine Handlung oder für dieses eine Objekt entscheidet, weshalb er in dieser einen Art und Weise die Bewegung des gemeinsamen Bildes entwickeln möchte.

An diesem Punkt klärt sich die Besonderheit einer BLACK MARKET – Performance. Denn an sich ist es nichts Außergewöhnliches, wenn zwei oder mehrere Personen einen Raum betreten und sich gemäß vorher abgesprochenen Regeln zueinander in Beziehung setzen. Die Frage läßt sich auch nicht mit der Existenz von BM speziellen Arbeitsregeln beantworten, denn solche gibt es nicht. Nicht einmal das erläuterte Prinzip der Begegnung würde voraussichtlich von jedem Mitglied geteilt. Die Antwort liegt darin, daß es genau diese Künstler sind, die hier zusammengefunden haben; Künstler, die von den Persönlichkeiten her denkbar unterschiedlich sind, die aber alle, wenn auch unausgesprochen, eine gemeinsame Haltung, eine ähnliche Motivation hinsichtlich ihrer künstlerischen Arbeit teilen: Boris Nieslony nennt es mentales Netzwerk oder parallele Energie, man könnte es auch schlicht Sympathie oder eine grundsätzliche Gläubigkeit nennen. Ich könnte jedenfalls meine Motivation für die Entscheidung zu einer ganz bestimmten Handlung innerhalb einer BLACK MARKET -Performance nicht anders begründen, als mit dem Wunsch aus einer Position der Zuneigung heraus dieses gemeinsame Bild zu bereichern. Diese eigentümlich spirituelle künstlerische Haltung ist es, die für mich eine wesentliche Qualität in der Zusammenarbeit von BLACK MARKET darstellt.

Jürgen Fritz

Frankfurt, im Oktober 1998

CLOSE

ASSOCIATED ARTISTS (in random order)

FORMERLY ASSOCIATED ARTISTS